Reflections on Character Education From a Former Secondary School Teacher

Before coming to the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, I spent three years training and working as a secondary school teacher. Working in this role fuelled my conviction for character education within schools and allowed me valuable insight into the concerns that teachers have about the idea of its implementation. This blog explores those... Continue Reading →

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Developing Character Skills in Schools – A Teacher’s Response

The teaching profession's reaction to the recent publication of the Department of Education’s (DfE) report Developing Character Skills in Schools can best be described as mixed. The survey, the DfE’s first foray into the field of empirical research on character education provision, was completed by 880 education institutes, and the report has produced some interesting... Continue Reading →

Character Education in East Asia and England

The goals of character building in East Asian countries is often presented as a shared cultural construct and positioned within an East-West dichotomy. However, it is not at all clear that East Asian forms of character education are as easily identifiable and distinct or that they always transcend national and cultural values. The former Secretary... Continue Reading →

Practice makes perfect in a school of virtue

University of Birmingham School principal Michael Roden talks to Richard McComb There cannot be many homework planners where one of the most prominent pages asks pupils: “What virtues have you shown today?” Below the question, embedded in a heart shape, are words such as kindness, courage, service, resilience, honesty, loyalty and kindness. Anchoring the page,... Continue Reading →

Teachers as Role Models: a classroom quandary

What is the most important moral lesson in a school’s character curriculum? According to American educational psychologist Thomas Lickona, it is the idea that teachers can only cultivate children’s character if they display it themselves. While we have all heard the mantra that virtue is first “caught” and then “taught”, I doubt whether the meaning... Continue Reading →

Virtue ethics and the modern-day nurse

A staff nurse enjoys working on a ward for the elderly but ongoing changes to the hospital regime means she has less time to spend with patients. There are fewer nurses on duty, she grows increasingly frustrated, stops enjoying her job and is worried that patient care is being comprised. The nurse’s worst fears are... Continue Reading →

It’s time to close the school “exam factories”

Educational assessment can seriously damage a child’s health in Britain’s modern schools system. At least, that is the belief of a union representing educational professionals. A recent survey by the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) suggests the mental health of children as young as six is being put at risk by overwhelming assessment stress.[i] What... Continue Reading →

The Rise of the Academy Chain

The Government’s recently announced commitment to ensure that ‘by 2020 every primary and secondary school in England will be, or be in the process of becoming, an academy’ has generated discussion, concern and questions. The academy programme was initially introduced by the Labour government in 2000 and aimed specifically to turn around schools that were... Continue Reading →

Dramatic Moral Conversions: Do They Exist?

In this blog posting, I will be asking you for your views and stories on a phenomenon that intrigues me: dramatic and sudden (in other words, ‘epiphanic’) moral conversions. On the road to Damascus, Saul – the rabid persecutor of early Christians – reportedly went through an experience that had a profound effect on his... Continue Reading →

A View From the Centre

Welcome to ‘Virtue Insight’, the Jubilee Centre blog. On this blog, we, the staff of the Jubilee Centre, will be posting reflections on issues that are close to our hearts and to the work that we are undertaking across the field of character and virtues.

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